Research

Research

As a critical social worker whose scholarship is inextricably linked to her activism, Janae Bonsu studies state systems and institutions, and the impact of these institutions on Black women's lives. She is working on her doctorate at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where her dissertation is tentatively titled, "Imagining Alternatives: State Violence Against Black Women and Their Visions of Safety."

Janae's past research has explored the effect of criminal justice reform on academic achievement, the impacts of subsidized employment programs, the impact of video visitation in jails on family functioning and more.

Janae's past research has explored the effect of criminal justice reform on academic achievement, the impacts of subsidized employment programs, the impact of video visitation in jails on family functioning and more.

Teaching

Janae's teaching interests center around social movements, race, gender, sexuality, feminism, advocacy, social welfare policy, and social change. Through a combination of community practice, professional, and life experience, Janae is well-suited to teach courses related to these topics. 

Janae has given several guest lectures at Chicago-area universities. Janae also has teaching experience with the Fortune Society as a GED-prep instructor to formerly incarcerated people looking to establish stable lives after prison.

Courses

|Spring 2018|

Community Action and Resistance, Northeastern Illinois University, Department of Sociology

Critical Social Work in a Multicultural Society, University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Social Work

|Fall 2017|

Social Movements, Northeastern Illinois University, Department of Sociology

Human Behavior in the Social Environment, University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Social Work